REVIEWED: Tell Tale

Tell Tale by Jeffrey Archer (Short Story Collection, October 2017).   One of the great British crime novelists of the current era, Jeffrey Archer also writes outstanding short stories. This is his first new collection in about a decade and features a wide-ranging variety of stories, including several truly outstanding efforts. Locales and subject matters covered in […]

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REVIEWED: The Liar in the Library

The Liar in the Library by Simon Brett (Cozy Murder Mystery, 2017). A newly successful, yet ego-driven, creepy and womanizing author, Burton St. Clair gives a reading and talk in the library of Fethering, a small English coastal town. Then he promptly gets himself murdered in the parking lot after hours. In the process, he inadvertently […]

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REVIEWED: To Die But Once

To Die But Once by Jacqueline Winspear (Histotical Mystery Novel, 2018). There seems an almost endless number of crime-solving novel series. This, I’m informed, is the 14th book about psychologist/investigator Maisie Dobbs—yet it’s also my first exposure to her, the people around her and the various cases she takes on. Some basics: The series is set […]

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REVIEWED: The Secrets She Keeps

The Secrets She Keeps by Michael Robotham (Psychological Thriller, 2017). On the surface, Meghan has a pretty wonderful life. She’s married to a handsome and successful sportscaster. She has two lovely kids and is pregnant with a third. Plus she’s beautiful, elegant and well-educated, and she writes one of the most popular ‘Mummy’ blogs in all […]

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REVIEWED: Penhale Wood

Penhale Wood by Julia Thomas (Mystery Novel, 2017). This new mystery is about a cold case and has a pronounced focus on the motivations, psychologies and obsessions of its characters (even the relatively minor ones). It will definitely appeal to readers who like a multi-layered narrative with subplots, some only tenuously connected to the case itself. […]

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